Antonio Brown Slams Raiders for Fines Over Missed Practices

The 4519 - NFL Rumors, Gossip, Blogs, News, Discussion

Brown posted a letter from Raiders GM Mike Mayock on Instagram.

Source: www.complex.com

Can’t we all just get along?

AB is at it again.  This time he is irritating Mike Mayock, the GM ofthe  Raiders.  No wonder the Steelers didn’t want to deal with his antics anymore.  Missed meetings and practice, bad helmets, fighting with Big Ben, frozen feet…and on and on.  Get to playing football and STFU!

Good for Mayock.

UPDATE: According to a report from ESPN NFL insider Adam Schefter, wide receiver Antonio Brown and general manager Mike Mayock got into it Wednesday, and the team is now planning to suspend him. There is no word yet on the length of suspension. (Adam Schefter on Twitter)

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Summary of Crucial conversations – Tools for talking when the stakes are high by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Swizler

If you’re looking to enhance your communication skills, form rapport in challenging situations, and foster dialogue and mutual respect with those you find yourself at odds, take a look at Crucial Conversations.

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Crucial conversations – Tools for talking when the stakes are high by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Swizler. Summarised by Paul Arnold (Facilitator and Trainer)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Crucial-Conversations-Talking-Stakes-ebook/dp/B000GCFEV2/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1369466031&sr=1-2&keywords=crucial+conversations 

IN A NUTSHELL

Many ‘defining’ moments in life come from having crucial conversations (as these create significant shifts in attitude and behaviour). This book focuses on techniques on how to hold such conversations in a positive space when surrounded by highly charged emotions. Their findings are based on 25 years of research with 20,000 people.

Their model has essentially 7 steps:

1)  Start with the heart (i.e empathy and positive intent)

2)  Stay in dialogue

3)  Make it safe

4)  Don’t get hooked by emotion (or hook them)

5)  Agree a mutual purpose

6)  Separate facts from story

7)  Agree a clear action plan

THE BOOK

Our success in life is dictated by the quality of relationships we can engender…

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The Shady Story Behind Soaring Super Bowl Ticket Prices

The 4519 - NFL Rumors, Gossip, Blogs, News, Discussion

Allegations of collusion and marketplace manipulation are being thrown around as average asking prices for Super Bowl tickets topped a staggering $9,000 this week.

Generally speaking, every year, there’s a predictable arc to Super Bowl ticket prices on the secondary market. The market rate for Super Bowl tickets tends to be high (perhaps three times face value) in the days before the AFC and NFC Championship games, and then once it’s clear who will play in the Super Bowl, there’s usually a price spike as fans clamber for the chance to see their team win the title. After this initial wave of purchases subsides, prices tend to drop as Super Bowl Sunday nears and sellers don’t want to get stuck with seats at the last minute.

Understandably, the trajectory and peak for pricing is a little different every year, depending on which teams are squaring off and where…

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Fans see Seahawks off to Super Bowl

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Seahawks fans cheer their team at Sky Harbor Airport.  (Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Update 1:30 p.m.: The Seahawks have landed in Arizona, multiple social media reports from the team indicate.

Original post: Thousands of Seahawk fans lined a mile-long stretch of road in SeaTac Sunday morning to cheer on the team as it headed for the airport and Super Bowl XLIX in Arizona.

The Seahawks, in a caravan of several cars and chartered buses with tinted windows, rolled slowly by the intersection of South 188th Street and 42nd Avenue in SeaTac at about 10 a.m., led by police on motorcycles.

Russell Wilson and his Seahawks teammates deplane in Phoenix. (Dean Rutz / The Seattle Times)

Cheering fans shoved flags, handheld signs and cell phones into the air as the buses approached. Horns blared over the roar of voices. From behind the closed windows of the buses, people waved and took photos of the crowd.

See photos of the Seahawks send-off

Fans decked in blue and green hollered call and response cheers — “Sea!” and “Hawks!” — across South…

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Saturday Night Live expertly handles Tom Brady’s balls in cold open

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You want the truth about Deflate-gate? You can’t handle the truth about Deflate-gate.

Clueless Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, played by cast member Taran Killam, tries to put the football controversy to rest forSaturday Night Live‘s cold open on Jan. 24. “I don’t know things. I’m not a banker. I’m not a science computer,” he says in the sketch.

Instead, Brady hands off the blame to assistant equipment co-manager Dougie Spoons, played by cast member Bobby Moynihan, who protects the QB better than an offensive lineman.

Hat tip:  MASHABLE

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Deflategate: The Plot Thickens!

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Since 2010, New England Has the Lowest Fumble Rate in the NFL

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One of the many questions surrounding “Deflategate”—the controversy that has engulfed the New England Patriots—concerns what advantage an NFL team would gain from using a deflated football. Numerous players have said a softer ball is easier to grip, and a ball that’s easier to grip is harder to drop

New England coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady both denied ever purposely using footballs that were inflated below the NFL minimum. But on the basis of the allegations, the Count looked at the fumble rate of the Patriots compared with the rest of the league.

New England has had an uncanny ability to hold on to the football for quite some time. According to data compiled by Warren Sharp of Sharp Football Analysis, the Patriots fumble far less than any other team that plays outdoors, where the elements…

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Miss Breaking Bad? Try “True Detective” on HBO

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A southern noir serial killer murder mystery, following an odd couple of detectives who disagree about road trip philosophizing, and a story told by unreliable narrators, in two timelines, with meth dealers, satanists and some literary references, for good measure. So goes my attempt to sum up HBO’s True Detective in one sentence. It’s probably more useful to say that it’s a very good show.

Or more correctly, the first four of its eight-episode run have been very good. It is at once eerie, funny, occasionally frightening, a little obnoxious, strange and entertaining.

Our protagonists are two detectives, Marty Hart (Woody Harrelson) and Rust Cohle (Matthew McConaughey), and the plot follows two mysteries, separated by 17 years. In 1995, Hart and Cohle team up to track down a serial killer with a penchant for occult spectacle, and the deeper they get into the case the more each man unravels.

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Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey play a pair of odd detectives in this southern noir serial killer murder mystery show

In 2012, Hart and Cohle, badgeless and battered, are interviewed separately about the events of 1995, and about each other. Two new detectives are investigating a new murder with similarities to the original case, but it’s obvious that they’re interested in more than comparing notes. The modern mystery is twofold: what happened to destroy Hart and Cohle, and what’s going on with this new investigation?

But neither Hart nor Cohle want to co-operate, exactly, and between their personalities, personal demons and the sticky plot, it becomes slowly clear they aren’t trustworthy narrators. Hart pretends to be a regular family man, abiding by the world’s boundaries. Cohle, who’s also a bundle of contradictions, has hallucinatory visions from a past of drug abuse and is obsessively self-controlled – even with his binge drinking, if that makes any sense. One plays dumb and the other plays smart. With each of them telling skewed stories, and the 1995 hunt slipping into the surreal, it becomes clear that there’s probably only one “true detective” meant to piece this puzzle together, and that detective is you.

And it’s great fun. McConaughey outdoes himself (again) at playing a captivating weirdo, and he makes his unlikely character convincing in all kinds of ways. His bleak, sometimes annoying proclamations (“We are things that labor under the illusion of having a self.”) are redeemed by brilliantly deadpan cracks (Hart suggests an evangelical tent congregation has moved, Cohle quips: “Tents usually do.”) and he plays a functional addict – hyper-self-aware and painfully tense – extremely well.

Harrelson, meanwhile, gets amusingly and understandably fed up with Cohle (“Let’s make the car a place of silent reflection”), even as he undermines his straight-man act. The banter is uneven and can verge on melodramatic, but Cohle’s witticisms and sheer awkwardness, along with Hart’s quiet moments of exasperation, usually make up for the flaws.

And like Cohle, the show itself can be delightfully and creepily weird. Director Cary Fukunaga lingers on bizarre bits of Louisiana’s landscape and finds clever ways to play with perception. (In one still scene, a ship, of which only the top half is visible behind a hill, slowly moves in the background, creating the illusion of the background moving past the foreground.) T Bone Burnett, master of Americana, provides all the right music: eerie drums in a desolate church, rangy guitar on the road and terrifying God-knows-what for a distant shot of a man in his underwear wandering the swamp with a machete.

True Detective may fail to reach the high bar its set itself – I didn’t even get to the allusions to Ambrose Bierce and Joseph Conrad – but that doesn’t mean it’s not worth watching. This story is a one-off for the writer, director and cast; no matter what, Cohle and Hart aren’t coming back after episode eight. Anything could happen.

But the show is really worth it for the tricky storytelling, the careful details and the strong performances (including from Michelle Monaghan, who does a lot with little as Hart’s wife). Don’t get me wrong, True Detective is grim, dark and occasionally pompous, but it earns every minute of the time you invest in it.

Orginal article here